Celebrating Ghanaian Animation: the Golden Movie Awards


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We’re crazy excited to announce that the animated films of COMFORT ARTHUR andFRANCIS Y. BROWN have been nominated in the Golden Animation category of theGolden Movie Awards.

In its second year, the award will for the first time, highlight Ghanaian animation talent. The nominated films are Brown’s school project, Agorkoli: Cause of Hogbetsotso, a retelling of the history of the Ewe people and Comfort’s films, the Peculiar Life of a Spider,a dark comedy abut how Kwaku Anansi tackles issues such as depression and identity crisis and Imaging. Continue reading

African Animation You Should Know (Part 1)


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Finding niche content like homegrown African animation can be a chore sometimes on the internet. Lucky you, we at Squid are passionate about discovering and promoting content we can lay our hands on.

In the spirit of our inner geeks, here’s the first part in a series of lists of five animated projects you can check out and support by spreading the word, appreciating their creators or donating money if the option is available.  And most importantly, we hope you’re inspired to add value to what’s out there by creating your own stories, be it through conceptualizing, writing, illustrating or animating. A start is a start wherever you go.

Let’s do this!.

The Sim

Sim is a really short but beautiful, minimalist sci-fi animation with fluid motions that will leave you begging for more. Animated by Eri Umusu, it follows a woman, Simisola Williams’ kill or be killed mission in a very basic simulated world. She battles several robots and does so with so much pizazz the Kingsmen would be jealous. The fast paced fight sequences are reminiscent of RWBY and Sword of the Stranger and the weapons, something between Tron and Star Wars’ light-sabers. Sim ends with a big cliffhanger when Sim’s subjugator operates the machines that facilitate the simulation and the dawning realization that she might be a robot or a clone. If you’re reading this Eri, we’re begging for more.

Ghana

Gyimah Gariba is a beast. His illustrations are beast 2.0. His animated short, an insightful glimpse into the lives of two friends on either end of the economic divide? See for yourself.

Check out the rest of the post here.

Afrogames: An Animated Series


You’re walking down the street when you hear something loud from behind you with such force that your hairs briefly rise in alarm. Instinct kicks in and you step to the side then look behind you. You kiss your teeth, smirk and amusingly scold yourself for the silly scare. In fact, you look on nostalgically as a bunch of kids zoom past you in what looks like a wheelbarrow race but really is just them pushing old car tires with sticks in them, sometimes with water for lubrication.

akolabone Back In The Day

Tire x Sticks Illustrated by Okyne Taylor

The unburdened excitement plastered on their faces stirs something within you. Ah, childhood memories. Then you wonder, what if? Continue reading

Abuela Grillo


I came across this beautiful animated short I can’t help but share. It’s titled Abuela Grillo which I suspect is Dominican (no idea why) for Rain Goddess. Hang on let me Google Translate.  Ha, I’m so far off. It means Cricket Grandmother [🤔] and it’s actually Spanish. The animation is an adaptation of Bolivian Ayoreo mythology.

It’s a 12 minute animation about an old woman whose only joy is to sing and with it, bring rains and crop. The story follows her as she’s rejected by a village she nearly floods because of her warm reception to her ensnarement by agents of capitalism and corporate greed. It’s 2D, straightforward,  has interesting character designs, a delightful score, beautiful anthropomorphism and you should definitely watch it. 🙂

Ghost Writing Africa


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 I interpreted “Africa is the greatest ghost writer of all time” wrongly the first time, thinking it alluded to the phenomena of having our narratives told by other cultures.  Dissecting the phrase further led to an epiphany that the continent is the foundation of many of the world’s stories, many of such (remove second stories)stories that too often refuse to acknowledge her as their muse. Looking at it again, this new understanding doesn’t stray too far from the original. Other people are after all telling our stories while we take a most unprofitable backseat trunk rest.

I love comics at heart. I know this because I’m online everyday looking for them. But not the kind you’re thinking. There’s an overwhelming pool of content from established names like DC, Marvel and DarkHorse, each telling stories well suited to specific demographics. Stories that while beautiful and easily relatable, are strange and so distant from us. I scour the internet for entirely African created content and while there are quite a few, I’ve noticed a problematic trend. Nigeria has sort of become the locus of African comics, superhero titles anyway.

Continue reading