Kings and Gods


image

The Ghanaian Hiphop scene is worked up thanks to a rap Cold War between two of its heavyweights, M.anifest and Sarkodie. Tracks have been released, shots have been fired, sides have been taken, debates rage on over who’s better, the beef has permeated I daresay, the national discourse and Ghanaian illustrators are flexing their design muscles and expressing their opinions and expectations through their work.

Below is a collection of art pieces on the ongoing beef that hit our radar along with links to the songs that fuel this much needed lyrical brouhaha. Paraphrasing Swayye Kidd, this beef is a win for Ghanian hip-hop and in our case, art. Continue reading

In honor of Nigerian Democracy – June XII, a comic review


June XII is the title and lead character in Ibrahim “Sirgai” Ganiyu’s comic. June XII marks the first elections after the 1983 military coup that resulted in the widely acknowledged victory of Moshood Abiola in 1993 and subsequently, its annulment by Ibrahim Babaginda and eventually, General Sonny Abacha’s coup.

The day is celebrated by some in pro-Abiola states. In a 2013 interview with Vanguard, Senator Roland Owie argued that, while the elections were free and fair, the events leading to Abiola’s candidature and presumed victory weren’t as rosy. That notwithstanding, the day stands as a herald of Nigerian democracy and some have even hailed it as Nigeria’s true democracy day. This is most likely Sirgai’s inspiration for the comic and we’re grateful for the birth of a living corruption eraser.

On the twenty-third anniversary of the day that spurred the comic, we share our thoughts.

Continue reading

Hero Kekere is Ghenghenstic!


image

COMIC REPUBLIC are legit, one mega comic force to reckon with on the continent. Spawning characters such as Guardian Prime who, at first glance, seems like a superman copy but is many leagues different, to Eru, the manifestation of fear to Jade Waziri, a hardened, no-nonsense commander, these guys know their stuff. Continue reading

Celebrating Ghanaian Animation: the Golden Movie Awards


tumblr_inline_o7ue75rn0u1tojgs3_1280

We’re crazy excited to announce that the animated films of COMFORT ARTHUR andFRANCIS Y. BROWN have been nominated in the Golden Animation category of theGolden Movie Awards.

In its second year, the award will for the first time, highlight Ghanaian animation talent. The nominated films are Brown’s school project, Agorkoli: Cause of Hogbetsotso, a retelling of the history of the Ewe people and Comfort’s films, the Peculiar Life of a Spider,a dark comedy abut how Kwaku Anansi tackles issues such as depression and identity crisis and Imaging. Continue reading

African Animation You Should Know (Part 1)


image

Finding niche content like homegrown African animation can be a chore sometimes on the internet. Lucky you, we at Squid are passionate about discovering and promoting content we can lay our hands on.

In the spirit of our inner geeks, here’s the first part in a series of lists of five animated projects you can check out and support by spreading the word, appreciating their creators or donating money if the option is available.  And most importantly, we hope you’re inspired to add value to what’s out there by creating your own stories, be it through conceptualizing, writing, illustrating or animating. A start is a start wherever you go.

Let’s do this!.

The Sim

Sim is a really short but beautiful, minimalist sci-fi animation with fluid motions that will leave you begging for more. Animated by Eri Umusu, it follows a woman, Simisola Williams’ kill or be killed mission in a very basic simulated world. She battles several robots and does so with so much pizazz the Kingsmen would be jealous. The fast paced fight sequences are reminiscent of RWBY and Sword of the Stranger and the weapons, something between Tron and Star Wars’ light-sabers. Sim ends with a big cliffhanger when Sim’s subjugator operates the machines that facilitate the simulation and the dawning realization that she might be a robot or a clone. If you’re reading this Eri, we’re begging for more.

Ghana

Gyimah Gariba is a beast. His illustrations are beast 2.0. His animated short, an insightful glimpse into the lives of two friends on either end of the economic divide? See for yourself.

Check out the rest of the post here.

Dunamis: Hope For The Marginalized


image

Ghanaian investigative journalist Anas Aremeyaw Anas in 2011 together with a local journalist and an activist released a documentary that showed harrowing visuals of the ordeal of Albinos in Tanzania, who are believed to be vested with magical power. According to an Al- Jazeera article on the documentary, for some people, “a white-skinned African person is seen as a kind of phantom or ghost, who rather than die, will dissolve or disappear with the wind and rain”.  Continue reading

Afrogames: An Animated Series


You’re walking down the street when you hear something loud from behind you with such force that your hairs briefly rise in alarm. Instinct kicks in and you step to the side then look behind you. You kiss your teeth, smirk and amusingly scold yourself for the silly scare. In fact, you look on nostalgically as a bunch of kids zoom past you in what looks like a wheelbarrow race but really is just them pushing old car tires with sticks in them, sometimes with water for lubrication.

akolabone Back In The Day

Tire x Sticks Illustrated by Okyne Taylor

The unburdened excitement plastered on their faces stirs something within you. Ah, childhood memories. Then you wonder, what if? Continue reading